Sunday, 25 March 2012

I never knew before what such a love as you have made me feel was.

I did not believe in it, my fancy was afraid of it, lest it should burn me up.






But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire,

it will not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures.







(John Keats letter to Fanny Brawne, 8 July 1819)

Thursday, 15 March 2012

Raise a glass tomorrow...

...and remember Captain Lawrence 'Titus' Oates. It was 100 years ago on 16th March that he walked out of the tent and chose to freeze to death. Did he utter the most heartbreaking and bravest last words ever? Such wonderful understatement. How brave they all were, although Scott seemed to make many foolish descions. Thinking that man-hauling the sledges was somehow more noble than using dogs. Gathering rocks when his men were dying. Yet his journals show how much he fretted and cared about his men. Scott tried and failed; it was the failure that makes the story so unforgettable and moving.



Soft silken embers




It is recovered.
What? Eternity.
In the whirling light
Of the sun in the sea.
O my eternal soul,
Hold fast to desire
In spite of the night
And the day on fire.
You must set yourself free
From the striving of Man
And the applause of the World!
You must fly as you can...
No hope, forever; No _orietur._
Science and patience,
The torment is sure.
The fire within you,
Soft silken embers,
Is our whole duty--
But no one remembers.
It is recovered.
What? Eternity.
In the whirling light
Of the sun in the sea.